Wild mushrooms can kill your child

After a spring or summer shower, you often find wild mushrooms and toadstools sprouting up in the lawn. They are fascinating to children, and they can also be deadly. Many wild mushrooms and toadstools are highly toxic.

According to this page

    The most poisonous mushrooms are members of the Amanita, which are responsible for most of the mushroom-related deaths that occur each year. These mushrooms contain a substance, which causes liver damage. They are so poisonous that it is estimated that one mushroom cap from an Amanita can kill a man. Tragically, these mushrooms do not produce symptoms until many hours after they are eaten. By that time, treatment is usually of little value.
Unfortunately, there is no way for you to tell the difference between a poisonous mushroom and a benign one. If your child eats a wild musroom, you have to take it seriously and call the poison control center or the emergency room. If possible, take samples of the ingested mushrooms with you to the emergency room.

Steps you can take

  • NEVER allow children to touch or eat wild mushrooms.

  • NEVER bring wild mushrooms into the house.

  • Teach children about the danger of wild mushrooms.

  • Eliminate mushrooms in the yard or areas frequented by your children when they first sprout.

Additional Resources


Home Page - A project of DecidingToBeBetter

© Copyright 2011, BYG Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved.

CarefulParents is all about keeping kids safe in today's world!

10 Basic Hazards You should Know About

  • Dogs
  • Pot on the stove
  • Plastic bags
  • Electrical outlets
  • Stairs
  • Windows
  • Choking
  • Cords on blinds/drapes
  • Balloons
  • Trapped

  • Newest Entries

  • Hot Cars
  • Tylenol - update
  • Blind cords - update
  • Walkers
  • Aspirin
  • Wild mushrooms
  • Bathtubs
  • Buckets
  • Oven tipping
  • Sunburn
  • Scalding water

  • Top 10

  • Tylenol
  • Alligators
  • Pot on the stove
  • Cigarette butts
  • Honey
  • Dogs
  • Rip currents
  • Windows
  • Balloons
  • Mercury